Under promise, under pressure….

Under-promise and over-deliver. How many times have you heard that phrase? Chances are if you’ve been in coding business longer than a year, you’ve heard it at least once if not a dozen times.

As a web developer, we tend to have a wikipedia syndrome, yes I know we are all smart. We never be in the Coding Arena if you are not. A decent programmer has probably an IQ of 125. But sometimes, some of us tend to make over promises and we can do it all syndrome. Yes most probably you can do it and maybe you know someone can help you doing it. But what if???

It’s not the over-delivering part that is dangerous. Over-delivering and WOW-ing your client is good business. It increases client satisfaction, repeat business, and word of mouth which all leads to referrals. You can never add too much value for your clients.

It’s also not the commitment part that is trouble. You must make promises you can keep. This is common sense at it’s best.

A good programmer measure everything, his time, resources, environment and of course skills.

Promises You Intend To Keep
In order to commit with integrity, you must intend to keep your promise, make an under promise statement and you will have less pressure. This implies that you must believe the following:

1. You understand the project. If you don’t understand the conditions of satisfaction (including time), then you cannot expect to fulfill them. You are signing a contract that you haven’t read.

2. You have a robust plan. If your plan can be derailed by likely contingencies, then you cannot expect it to withstand their impact. You are hoping for the best, but not preparing for the worst.

3. You have the necessary skills and resources. If you don’t have the required skills and resources, then you cannot expect to finish the job. You are writing a fraudulent check with no funds in your account.

Divergent will never be the next Hunger Games or Twilight

After reading the last chapter of Divergent, I was so shocked, how often does the main character die in these things? I’ve always thought it was a little unrealistic how the hero always manages to escape unscathed after staring danger and death in the face over and over again. No closure on what so ever on part of Four. I was crushed and confused on the writer decision how to end the book. Come on, why do you think the Twilight and Hunger Games series were so successful? Lets face it, they were both very basic stories, a girl in love with a boy that out of her league and girl fighting back against tyrant, but they both delivers a very happy ending and concluded very wisely.

Ok not everyone loves to have a happy ending, but just to be different on other best sellers book is not an escaped to go against the based on the beginning of your story. Half of the fan base that finished the last book, tell people that they wished they’d never started the series is not a good book. Remember this is a young adult genre, they doesn’t want perfect character, Twilight and Hunger Games stumbled in their final installments, but the movie audience showed up because they knew how the stories ultimately ended and they knew that, despite the missteps along the way, they would get their payoff.

Maybe it just me… still reading a happily ever after stories, have hang ups with Cinderella and Snow white. But this is entertainment, I craving for happy ending and still believing that happy ending still existing though we don’t have perfect life.